Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Japanese Americans in the USA before & after Pearl Harbor by Henry Sugimoto 1900-1990

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An immigrant story of  World War II is often forgotten.  Ten weeks after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs Executive Order 9066, authorizing the removal of any or all people from military areas "as deemed necessary or desirable." The military defined the entire West Coast, home to the majority of Americans of Japanese ancestry or citizenship, as a military area. By June, more than 110,000 Japanese Americans were relocated to remote internment camps built by the U.S. military in scattered locations around the country. For the next 2 1/2 years, many of these Japanese Americans endured extremely difficult living conditions & poor treatment by their military guards.

On December 17, 1944, U.S. Major General Henry C. Pratt issued Public Proclamation No. 21, declaring that, effective January 2, 1945, Japanese-American "evacuees" from the West Coast could return to their homes. During the course of World War II, 10 Americans were convicted of spying for Japan, but not one of them was of Japanese ancestry. In 1988, President Ronald Reagan signed a bill to recompense each surviving internee with a tax-free check for $20,000 & an apology from the U.S. government.

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) Going to America

Henry Sugimoto was born in 1900 in Wakayama, Japan, and lived until the year 1990, when he died in the United States. During his lifetime, he created hundreds of works of original art, many pieces depicting the everyday lives of Japanese Americans in the World War II concentration camps, the experiences of Japanese American soldiers, and the Issei experience.

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) Working on a Farm

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) Washing Dishes

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) Picking Grapes

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) Working on the Railroad

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) Hearing News of Pearl Harbor

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) Immediately Taking Japanese Teachers to Camps

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) My Papa. Taking Japanese Men to Camps

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) Junk Shop Man Taking Refrigerator Without Paying for It

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) Goodybye, Mary

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) Planting Vegetables at Camp

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) Family in Camp Room

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) Mother in Camp Jerome

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) Our Mess Hall in Camp Jerome

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) Susie Ironing Camp Room

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) Our Washroom in Camp Jerome

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) Susie in Camp Jerome

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) Going to the Shower at the Camp

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) No Japanese Wanted

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) Bye Bye, Daddy

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) Goodbye, My Son

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) Praying for Safety

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) Died in the Battlefield

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) Returning the Flag to President Truman

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) Naturalization Ceremony

Henry Sugimoto (Japanese American artist, 1900-1990) Self Portrait

Copyright for these paintings is held by the Japanese American National Museum. Short-term educational use with limited circulation is permitted. For all other uses, please contact the Hirasaki National Resource Center at the Japanese American National Museum .
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