Monday, October 22, 2012

1930s America's Great Depression - Palmer Hayden 1890-1973



Palmer Hayden (American artist, 1890-1973) The Janitor Who Paints, 1939


Palmer Hayden was born Peyton Cole Hedgeman in Wide Water, Virginia. His artistic name, Palmer Hayden, was taken from the corrupted pronounciation of Peyton Hedgeman by a commanding sergeant during World War I. He received his first formal art training while in the military, enrolling in a correspondence course in drawing. He settled in New York after the war. Hayden studied at the Cooper Union in New York City & also practiced independent studies at Boothbay Art Colony in Maine. Palmer Hayden was one of two first recipients for the Harmon Foundation's Award for Artistic Achievement in 1926. The Harmon Foundation, created by real estate barron William Harmon, was one of the first organizations to nationally encourage, publicize, & tour artwork created by African Americans. With the award and with a grant from a patron, Hayden was able to continue his studies in Paris.


Palmer Hayden (American artist, 1890-1973) Jeunesse 1927


He returned to the United States in 1932, during the midst of the Great Depression, & worked steadily over the next several years for the U.S. government. Of this period, art historian Regina Perry wrote “Following his return from Paris in 1932, Hayden worked on the United States Treasury Art Project and the W.P.A. Art Project from 1934 to 1940, and painted scenes of the New York waterfront and other local subjects. During the late 1930s Hayden developed a consciously naive style, which represented various aspects of African-American life. One of the first paintings that heralded Hayden’s new style was Midsummer Night in Harlem, 1938, in which he effectively evoked the mood of Harlem’s residents congregating outside to escape the heat inside the tenements. Despite the flat forms and stylized figures, the compositional arrangement and treatment of perspective reveal Hayden’s academic training." Some criticized his work as satirical sterotypes, but Hayden said that he was not striving for satirical effects in his African-American folk paintings, but that he wanted to achieve a new type of expression.


Palmer Hayden (American artist, 1890-1973) Hammer in His Hand 1944


See Regenia A. Perry. Free within Ourselves: African-American Artists in the Collection of the National Museum of American Art (Washington, D.C.: National Museum of American Art in Association with Pomegranate Art Books, 1992 .


Palmer Hayden (American artist, 1890-1973) John Henry and Sreamdrill 1944


Palmer Hayden (American artist, 1890-1973) John Henry


Palmer Hayden (American artist, 1890-1973) Midsummer Night in Harlem, 1938


Palmer Hayden (American artist, 1890-1973) The Big Bend Tunnel 1944


Palmer Hayden (American artist, 1890-1973) The Blue Nile 1964


Palmer Hayden (American artist, 1890-1973) The Card Game 1930


Palmer Hayden (American artist, 1890-1973) The Dress She Wore Was Blue 1944


Palmer Hayden (American artist, 1890-1973) The Subway


Palmer Hayden (American artist, 1890-1973) The Theatre 1950


Palmer Hayden (American artist, 1890-1973) Barge Haulers 1950

Palmer Hayden (American artist, 1890-1973) Christmas 1939


Palmer Hayden (American artist, 1890-1973) Makin' Pie c 1940


Palmer Hayden (American artist, 1890-1973) The Watermelon Race

1 comment:

  1. Thank you for sharing these images. How could I locate them to be print out to use as picture study. Thanks in Japan!

    Nicole

    ReplyDelete