Monday, June 15, 2015

1502 Nuremberg Garden of Magdalene Pairin in Genealogy of the Derrer Family, about 1626–1711, Georg Strauch


The 1502 Nuremberg Residence and Garden of Magdalene Pairin in Genealogy of the Derrer Family, about 1626–1711, Georg Strauch (German, 1613-1675)

This image of an estate with a garden in Nuremberg, Germany, appears at the end of a series of Derrer family portraits in their illustrated genealogy. The gardenis arranged into flower & vegetable beds surrounded by fruit trees. The residence is built of large, square blocks of stone, known as ashlar masonry. Because gardens are surely more impermanent & ephemeral than the stones of the house, this visual record of one of the Derrers' houses & gardens was a particularly effective way of preserving the family's status by looking at what they built & how they fashioned nature for both art & utility around them long after the death of the owner of this particular house & garden. Local tradition refers to this region of Nuremberg as the Garden of the Hesperides, mythical nymphs who tended a grove of golden fruit-bearing trees. Nuremberg gardens grow citrus trees.


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