Thursday, September 10, 2015

Queen Elizabeth I - New Year's Gifts 1588-1589



1590 Queen Elizabeth I 1533-1603 Unknown Artist Jesus College Oxford

An explanation of these lists appeared on the Museum of London blog.  Thought I would share it here to give a background on these amazing lists.

In Elizabethan London, New Year’s Day was the big time to give and receive gifts, particularly at court. The tradition appears to date back to at least the 13th century but under Queen Elizabeth I it reached new heights in terms of the extravagance and range of the gifts given.

Courtiers and members of the Queen’s household were expected to present her with gifts. As can be imagined competition to impress the Queen was fierce and there must have been immense pressure to come up with gifts that were valuable enough (many resorted to giving money, usually gold coins, in extravagant silk purses) or useful (she received many perfumed gloves and gold-trimmed hankies) or just intriguing.


In the latter category are many animal jewels, such as an emerald, diamond and ruby serpent with a pendant pearl, given in 1581 by the Countess of Oxford or a golden cat playing with mice and again decorated with diamonds and pearls given the same year by Lady Howard. One can imagine the emerald and diamond salamander or the pearl ship pin from the Cheapside Hoard being equally acceptable New Year’s gifts. The Queen loved puns and many of these jewels would have held hidden meanings and witty jokes for her amusement.


A number of rolls or lists detailing the gifts she received for New Year still survive and give a fascinating glimpse of life in the Elizabethan court. Many of the queen’s admirers liked to give her a gift which would remind her of themselves. Sir Christopher Hatton, whose portrait is on display in the Cheapside Hoard exhibition, on loan from the National Portrait Gallery, frequently used a knot motif and so in around 1585 he gave Elizabeth a headdress, decorated with expensive golden knots. In 1574 the fan that the Earl of Leicester gave her was decorated with bears, part of his device. Others gave gifts that they hoped would get them noticed and some of these were rather fabulous. For example, on New Year’s Day 1581 Sir Walter Raleigh presented Elizabeth with a crown set with Peruvian emeralds which he had captured in a raid on the Spanish fleet the previous year. However, the rolls show that she also received plainer gifts such as a quince pie from John Betts, who was a pastry servant, or a box of lute strings or eighteen larks in a cage.


In return the Queen would give gifts too, and whilst these were sometimes generous in the extreme, more often than not they were of a lower value than those she received. Often she would give an image of herself, such as the cameo portrait of the Queen which Hatton is shown holding in his portrait. A similar, though smaller cameo can be seen on display as part of the Cheapside Hoard. But if you wanted to impress the Queen it seems to have been much more a case of five gold rings rather than a partridge in a pear tree!


New Year's Gifts for Queen Elizabeth: 1588-1589

Anno Regni Regine Elizabeth tricesimo-primo, 1588-9
Newe Yeare's Guiftes gyven to the Queene's Majesty at Her Highnes Mannour of Richmond, by these Parsons whose names do hereafter ensewe, the first daye, the yeare aforesaide.

 £. s. d.
By Sir Christopher Hatton, Knight, Lord Chancellor of England, a coller of gold, conteyninge 11 peeces, whereof four made like scallop shells garneshed round about with small diamonds and rubyes, one pearle pendaunt and two rubyes pendaunt without foyle, six other longer peeces eche garnesshed with seven pearles, five rubyes of two sorts, sparks of diamonds and two rubyes pendaunt without foyle, having a bigger peece in the middest like a scallopp shell, garneshed with diamonds and rubyes of sundry bignesses, one pearle in the topp, one rock ruby in the middest, having three fishes pendaunt garneshed on th'one side with sparks of diamonds and two rubyes pendaunt, without foyle, and with one peece at eche end of them garneshed with two small rubyes and one pearle, and a peire of braceletts of gold, conteyninge 12 peeces, six like knotts garnesshed with sparks of diamonds, and six like knotts garnesshed with sparks of rubyes, and two pearles in a peece, and two pearles betweene eche peece.
Delivered to Mrs. Ratcliffe.
By the Lorde Burleigh, Lord High Treasorer of England, in golde 20 0 0
By the Lord Marques of Winchester, in golde 20 0 0
Delivered to Mr. Henry Sackford, one of the Groomes of her Majestie's Pryvie Chamber.

Earles.
By the Earle of Shrewesbury, in gold 20 0 0
By the Earle of Darby, in gold 20 0 0
By the Earle of Sussex, in gold 10 0 0
By the Earle of Huntingdon, in gold 10 0 0
By the Earle of Bath, in gold 20 0 0
By the Earle of Warwick, a sarceonet of gold, conteyninge 15 peeces, seven sett with foure rubyes, and one small diamond in the middest, the other seven sett with nyne pearles in a peece sett in gold, having a rowe of small pearles on thupside, and pendaunts of sparks of rubyes, oppalls, and ragged pearles.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Ratcliff.
By the Earle of Hertford, in gold 10 0 0
By the Earle of Lincoln, in gold 10 0 0
By the Earle of Penbrok, in gold 20 0 0
Delivered to the said Mr. Sackford.
By the Earle of Ormound, part of a petticote of carnation satten embrodered with a broade garde or border of antyques of flowers and fyshes of Venis gold, silver, and silke, and all over with a twist of Venis gold.
Delivered to the Roabes.
By the Earle of Northumberland, one jwell of golde like a lampe garnesshed with sparks of diamonds and one oppall
By the Earl of Cumberland, a jewell of gold like a sacrifice.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Ratclife.

Vicounte.
By the Vicounte Mountague, in gold 10 0 0
Delivered to the said Mr. Sackford.

Marquesse and Countesses.
By the Lady Marquesse of Northampton, a peire of braceletts of gold conteyning 16 peeces, four enamuled white set with one pearle in a peece, and four sparks of rubyes a peece, the other foure sett with one dasy and a small ruby in the middest thereof, and four small pearles and eight longe peeces betwene them, ech sett with small diamonds and two sparks of rubyes.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Ratcliff.
By the Countesse of Shrewsbury, a safegard with a jhup or gaskyn coat of faire cullored satten, like flames of fire of gold, and garnesshed with buttons, loupes, and lace of Venis silver.
Delivered to the Roabes.
By the Countesse of Huntington, in gold 8 0 0
Delivered to the said Mr. Sackford.
By the Countesse of Warwick, a chayne, containing 22 aggetts slytely garnesshed with gold, and 22 bawles of jheat slytely garnesshed over with seede pearles.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Ratcliff.
By the Countesse of Lyncoln, widdowe, a longe cloake of murry velvet, with a border rounde aboute of a small chenye lace of Venis silver, and two rowes of buttons and lowpes of like silver furred thorough with mynnyover and calloper like myll pykes.
Delivered to the Roabes.
By the Countesse of Sussex, widdowe, in gold 10 0 0
By the Countesse of Sussex, in gold 10 0 0
By the Countesse of Penbrok, in gold 10 0 0
Delivered to the said Mr. Sackford.
By the Countesse of Bedforde, two large candlesticks of cristall garnesshed with silver gilte paynted, per oz. altogether 80 10 0
Charged upon John Astelly, Esquire, Master of our Juells and Plate.
By the Countesse of Cumberland, a peire of braselets, conteyninge eight peeces of gold, sett with sparks of diamonds and rubyes, and knotts or rundells of small pearles betwene them, threded.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Ratcliff.
By the Countesse of Southampton, in gold 10 0 0
By the Countesse of Rutland, in gold 10 0 0
By the Countesse of Hertford, in gold 10 0 0
Delivered to the said Mr. Sackford.
By the Countesse of Ormount, parte of a petticote of carnacon satten ymbrodered with a broade garde or border of anticks of flowers and fishes of Venis gold, silver, and all over with a twist of Venis gold.
Delivered to the Roabes.
By the Countesse of Bath, a fanne of swanne downe, with a maze of greene velvet, ymbrodered with seed pearles and a very small chayne of silver gilte, and in the middest a border on both sides of seed pearles, sparks of rubyes and emerods, and thereon a monster of gold, the head and breast mother-of-pearles; and a skarfe of white stitche cloth florished with Venis gold, silver, and carnacion silke.
Delivered the fanne to the Roabes; and the skarfe to Mrs. Carr.

Vicountesse.
By the Vicountesse Mountagu, in gold 10 0 0
Delivered to the said Mr. Sackford.

Busshops.
By the Archbusshopp of Canterbury, in gold 40 0 0
By the Busshopp of London, in gold 20 0 0
By the Busshop of Salisbury, in gold 20 0 0
By the Busshopp of Winchester, in gold 20 0 0
By the Busshopp of Lincoln, in gold 20 0 0
By the Busshopp of Worcester, in gold 20 0 0
By the Busshopp of Bathe, in gold 20 0 0
By the Busshopp of Norwich, in gold 20 0 0
By the Busshopp of Lichfeild and Coventry, in gold and silver 13 6 8
By the Busshopp of Carleill, in gold 10 0 0
By the Busshopp of Peterburrowe, in gold 9 16 6
By the Busshopp of Chester, in gold 10 0 0
By the Busshopp of Rochester, in gold 10 0 0
By the Busshopp of Exceter, in gold 10 0 0
By the Busshopp of St. David, in gold 10 0 0
By the Busshopp of Chichester, in gold 20 0 0
By the Busshopp of Gloucester, in gold 10 0 0
By the Busshopp of Hereford, in gold 10 0 0
Delivered to the said Mr. Sackford.

Lordes.
By the Lord Hunsdon, Lord Chamberleyne, the nether skirts of the coveringe of a gowne, black stitcht cloth, florished with gold, and some owes.
Delivered to the Roabes.
By the Lord Howard, Lord Admirall, a sarceonett of gold, conteyninge fyve peeces garnesshed with sparks of diamounds, foure whereof each a ruby, foure lesse peeces like knotts garnesshed with sparks of diamound, eight litl pendaunts of diamounds without foile, and nine small pearles pendaunt.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Ratcliff.
By the Lord Cobham, in gold 10 0 0
By the Lord Darcy of Chiche, in gold 9 17 6
By the Lord Shandoyes, in gold 10 0 0
By the Lord Compton, in gold 10 0 0
By the Lord Norris, in gold 10 0 0
By the Lord Lumley, in gold 10 0 0
By the Lord Wharton, in gold 10 0 0
By the Lord Ritch, in gold 10 0 0
By the Lord of Buckhurst, in gold 5 0 0
By the Lord North, in gold 10 0 0
Delivered to the said Mr. Sackford.
By the Lord Seymer, a comfett box of mother-of-pearles, garnesshed with small sparks of rubies.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Ratcliff.

Baronesses.
By the Barronesse Burghley, a porringer of gold with a cover, per oz. 24 oz.
Charged upon John Asteley, Esq.
By the Barrones Hunsdon, a peire of bodies for the covering of a gowne of black stitcht cloth, florished with gold and some owes.
By the Barronesse Howard, a covering of a gowne of black nett-work, faire florished over with Venis gold.
By the Barrones Cobham, a petticote of faire cullored caffa laid with six laces of Venis silver with plate.
By the Barrones Dakers, a petticote of white chamlett striped with silver, printed with a border of six broade bone laces of Venis gold and silver plate, and striped all over broade arrowehedwyse, with a lesse lace of like venis gold and silver plate.
Delivered to the Roabes.
By the Barrones Lumley, a wastecoate of white taffety, imbrodered all ovre with a twist of flowers of Venis gold, silver, and some black silke.
Delivered to Mrs. Skidmore.
By the Barrones Shandowes Knolls, a stoole of wood paynted, the seate covered with murry velvet, ymbrodered all over with pillers arched of Venis gold, silver, and silke.
Charged upon Roberte Cotton, Yeoman of the Wardropp of bedds.
By the Barrones Shandoyes, in gold 10 0 0
By the Barronesse Sainte John Bletzowe, in gold 10 0 0
By the Barronesse Pagett Cary, in gold 10 0 0
Delivered to the said Mr. Sackford.
By the Barronesse Dudley, two ruffes with rabatines of lawne cut-work made, and one ruff of lawne cutt-work unmade.
Delivered to Mrs. Bonne.
By the Barronesse Cheney, a small jewell of gold sett wyth fyve diamounds of sundry cutts without foyle, and three small pearles pendaunt.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Ratcliffe.
By the Barronesse Wharton, in gold 10 0 0
By the Barronesse Buckhurst, in gold 5 0 0
By the Barronesse Barkeley, in gold 10 0 0
By the Barrones Norris, in gold 10 0 0
By the Barronesse Ritch, widdowe, in gold 10 0 0
Delivered to the said Mr. Sackford.
By the Barronesse Sheffield, one saddle cloth of black velvet, ymbrodered all over with Venis gold, with all the furniture belonginge for a saddle.
Delivered to the Stable.
By the Barronesse Rich, a fore parte of white nettworke like rundells, and buttons florished with Venis gold and owes layde upon purple satten, and lined with white sarsonet.
By the Barronesse Talbott, widowe, a mantle of black stitch cloth florished and seamed with Venis silver.
Delivered to the Roabes.

Ladies.
By the Lady Mary Seymer, wife to Mr. Rogers, a standitch of wood covered with silke needlework, garnished with a fewe seede pearles.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Skidmore.
By the Lady Elizabeth Seymer, wife to Mr. Richard Knightley, a skarfe of black nettwork, florished with silver, and lyned with faire cullored sarsonett.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Carre.
By the Lady Katheryn Constable, one longe cushion of black velvett, ymbrodered all over with flowers of silke needle-worke of sundry cullors and sorts, and backed with watchett damaske.
Delivered to the said Robert Cotton.
By the Lady Stafford, a peire of braseletts of gold, conteyninge 16 peeces, whereof eight enamuled white, four very small sparks of rubyes in a peece, and one ragged pearle in a peece of eche; the othe reight enamuled with five ragged pearles in a peece.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Ratcliff.
By the Lady Walsingham, one skimskyn of cloth of silver, ymbrodered all over very faire with beasts, fowles, and trees, of Venis gold, silver, silke, and small seed pearles, with fyve buttons of seede pearles, lyned with carnation plushe; a peire of perfumed gloves, the coaffe ymbrodered with seed pearle, and lyned with carnation velvett.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Carre.
By the Lady Hennage, one shorte cloke of black clothe of silver layde round about with a passmayne before, with buttons and lowpes of like lace of Venis gold and silver, lyned with white plushe.
Delivered to the Roabes.
By the Lady Carow, on smock of fyne Holland about wroughte with black silke.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Skidmore.
By the Lady Cheake, a fore parte of white nettworke florisshed with Venis gold, silver, and carnation silke, layde upon white satten.
Delivered to the Roabes.
By the Lady Drewry, a skimskyn of black cipres, florished with Venis gold and small seed pearles, with a border or rowe of seed pearles, with eight buttons of gold, ech of them four small ragged pearles with a garnett in eche of them.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Carre.
By the Lady Leyton, a waistcote of white sarsnett, ymbrodered round about with a border of eglantne flowers, and ymbrodered all over with a twist of Venis gold.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Skidmore.
By the Lady Southwell, a dooblett of lawne cuttwork, florished with squares of silver owes.
Delivered to the Roabes.
By the Lady Pawlett, in gold 5 0 0
By the Lady Jarrett, in gold 10 0 0
Delivered to the said Mr. Sackford.
By the Lady Digby, one cloke of black silke stitched cloth, florished with silver striped, layd upon faire cullored taffety, lyned with white plushe.
By the Lady Willoughby, a fore parte of lawne cuttwork, florished with silver and spangles.
Delivered to the Roabes.
By the Lady Scroope, a vaile of white knittwork, striped with rowles and silver plate.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Carre.
By the Lady Gresham, in gold 9 17 6
Delivered to the said Mr. Sackford.
By the Lady Ratcliff, a vaile of white stitch cloth striped, florished with Venis gold, silver, and some owes.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Carre.
By the Lady Souche, a smock of fyne Holland, wroughte with black silke.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Skidmore.
By the Lady Weste, a skimskyn of watched satten, ymbrodered with knotts of Venis gold, and lyned with carnation flushe.
By the Lady Longe, a skimskyn of cloth of silver, ymbrodered all over with beasts and flowers and a woman in the middest, lyned with carnation flushe.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Carre.
By the Lady Harrington, a wastecote of lawne, faire wroughte with Venis gold and black silke.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Skidmore.
By the Lady Townsende, a large ruffe of lawne cuttwork unmade.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Bonne.

Knights.
By Sir Fleaming Knowlls, Treasorer of the Houshold, in gold 10 0 0
By Sir James Croftes, Comptroller of the same, in gold 10 0 0
Delivered to the said Mr. Sackford.
By Sir Frauncis Walsingham, Principall Secretary, a cloke and a savegard of faire cullored velvet, laide round aboute and strped downe and eight lowpes and fore quarters of a broade passamayn lace of Venis gold and silver plate; the cloke lyned with printed cloth of silver, and the savegard lyned with white sarsonett; and a dooblett of hwite satten cutt, ymbrodered all over with esses of Venis gold, and striped overwhart with a passamayn of Venis gold and plate.
Delivered to the Roabes.
By Sir Thomas Hennage, one jewell of gold, like an Alpha and Omega, with sparks of diamonds.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Ratcliff.
By Sir Walter Mildemay, Chauncellor of thexchequer, in gold 10 0 0
By Sir Gilberte Jarrett, Master of the Rowles, in gold 20 0 0
By Sir Owen Hopton, Lievtenaunte of the Tower, in gold 10 0 0
Delivered to the said Mr. Sackford.
By Sir Thomas Layton, Capteine of Garnsey, a petticote of white sarsnett, imbrodered round about with a broad border like eglantyne flowers, and all over ymbrodered with a twist of Venis gold, and powderings of carnation silke.
By Sir Robert Sydney, a dooblett of white satten, embrodered all over like clouds very faire, of scallopp fashion, with flowers and fruits of Venis gold, silver, and silke, betwene them.
Delivered to the Roabes.
By Sir Henry Cromwell, in gold 10 0 0
By Sir Edwarde Cleare, in gold 10 0 0
Delivered to the said Mr. Sackford.
By Sir Thomas Cecil, a Frenche gowne of black silke nettworke, of two sorts, florished with Venis gold, and lyned with white chamlett.
By Sir Roberte Southwell, foareparte of lawne cutwork, florished with squares with owes.
Delivered at the Roabes.
By Sir John Parrett, one very small salte of aggett, with a cover and foote gold enamyled, garnished with small sparkes of rubyes and oppalls, the foote garnished with like rubyes, per oz. 1 oz. 3 quarters; and two Irishe mantles, the one murry, th'other russet, the one laced with silver lace and freindge, the other with gold lace and freindge.
The salte charged upon the said John Asteley, Esq. and the mantles delivered to John Whinyard.
By Sir Oratio Pavlavizino, one bodkyn of silver gilte, havinge a pendaunt jewell of gold, like a shipp, garnished with opaulls, sparks of diamonds, and three small pearles pendaunt.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Ratclife.
By Sir George Cary, a doblett of copp damaske, silver turned freindge lace, wrought with purle, and edged with a passamayn of silver.
Delivered to the Roabes.

Chaplyn.
John Thorneborow, Clark of the Closett, one small cupp, the bowle, foote, and parte of the cover of aggats, garnished with gold, and sett with small rubyes, pearles, and litle oppalls, per oz. all 5 oz. di. qr.
Charged on the said John Asteley.

Gentlewomen.
By Mrs. Blaunch Aparry, one long cushion of tawny cloth of gold, backed with taffety.
Delivered to the said Robert Cotton.
By Mrs. Mary Ratcliffe, a jewell of gold sett with a stone without a foyle, called Incentabella.
Delivered to her owne hande.
By Mrs. Fraunces Howarde, a skarf of black stitch cloth, florished with Venis gold and silver.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Carre.
By Mrs. Elizabeth Brooke, a skarf of white stitcht cloth, striped with black silke and silver, and florished with silver.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Carre.
By Mrs. Elizabeth Throgmorton, two ruffes of lawne cutwork made.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Bonne.
By Mrs. Edmounds, a cushen cloth of lawne cutwork like leaves, and a few owes of silver.
Delivered to Mrs. Skideamore.
By Mrs. Skideamore, parte of a loose gowne of black taffety with a border, ymbrodered with a chayne lace of Venis gold and tufts of white silke.
By Mrs. Wolley, a doblett of black stitcht cloth of two sorts, florished with Venis gold and silver.
Delivered to the Roabes.
By Mrs. Wetston, a skarf of black silke network, florished with Venis gold and silver, and lyned with faire cullored sarsonett; and two peire of weytinge tables, the one covered with needle-work, the other with crimsonn velvett.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Carre.
By Mrs. Allen, a ruff of lawne cuttwork unmade.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Bonne.
By Mrs. Dale, a saveguard of russett satten, florished with gold and silver, with buttons and lowpes downe before of Venis gold and silver, and bound about with a lace of like gold and silver.
By Mrs. Sackford, one peece of carnation grogreyne, florished with gold, conteyninge yardes …
Delivered to the Roabes.
By Mrs. Wyngfield, a nightraile of camberick, wroughte all over with black silke.
By Mrs. Carre, one sheete of fyne camberick, wrought all over with sundry fowles, beastes, and wormes, of silke of sundry cullers.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Skidmore.
By Mrs. Jane Brizells, a ruff of lawne cuttwork, with lilies of like cuttwork, sett with small seed pearles.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Bonne.
By Mrs. Vaughan, one peire of silke stockings and a peire of garters of white sypres.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Skidmore.
By Mrs. Smithson, two handkerchers of Holland wroughte with black silke.
By Mrs. Twist, a peire of sleeves of camberick wrought with black silke.
By Mrs. Cromer, a smock of fyne Holland, and the bodyes and sleeves wroughte all over with black silke.
By Mrs. Fyfield, a sweete bagge all over ymbrodered, and six handkerchers.
By Mrs. Huggens, 24 small sweete baggs of sarsenett of sundry cullors, and six handkerchers of camberick wrought with black silke, and edged with a passamayn of gold.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Skidmore.
By Mrs. Owen, a gerdle of white sipres, imbrodered at both ends with leaves of faire cullored silk of needle work, friendged with Venis gold, silver, and silke.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Carre.
By Mrs. Jones, six handkerchers of cambrick wroughte with black silke.
By Mrs. Robinson, a quoft and a forehead cloth florished with gold and silver.
By Mrs. Burley, six handkerchers of cambrick wrought with black silke.
By Mrs. Morgan, two boxes of wood, one charryes, th'other aberycocks.
By Mrs. Tomason, one handkercher of cambrick wrought with black silke.
By Mrs. West, one attire of stitched cloth and haire wroughte in eysing puffes.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Skidmore.
By Mrs. Bowne, one ruff of lawne cuttwork made upp.
Delivered to her Majestie's owne hands.

Gentlemen.
By Mr. Wolley, one of her Majestie's Secretaries, a round cloke of black cloth of gold, with buttons and lowpes on thinside of Venis gold and black like.
By Mr. Dyer, a petticote of white satten, quilted all over with Venis gold and silver, with some plats, with four borders embrodered with gillyflowers and roses of Venis gold, and lyned with white sarsenett.
By Mr. Bruncker, one shorte cloke of white stitcht cloth, florished all over with Venis gold, silver, and some carnation silke, layde upon white taffety, and lyned with white plushe; and a skarf of white stitch cloth, and striped with Venis silver.
Delivered to the Robbes, saving the skarf to Mrs. Car.
By Mr. Smith Customer, one boulte of camberick, and a whole peece of lawne.
By Mr. Garter King of Armes, a booke of Armes of the Noblemen in Henry the Fift's time.
By Mr. Newton, a bodkyn of silver gilte, with a pendaunt like a sonne, enamuled redd, and a moone therein, garnished with sparks of diamounds, and four very small pearles pendaunt.
Delivered to Mrs. Ratcliffe.
By Mr. Henry Brooke, a petticote of carnation capha florished with silver, with fyne broade passamayn laces of gold, silver, and watches silke.
By a Gentleman unknown, a fanne of sundry cullored fethers, with a handle of aggets garnished with silver gilte.
Delivered to the Roabes.
By Mr. John Stanhop, a large bagg of white satten, ymbrodered all over with flowers, beasts, and burds, of Venis gold, silver, and silke.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Skidmore.
By Mr. Skidamour, parte of a loose gowne of black taffety, with a border, imbrodered with a chaine lace of Venis gold, and tufts of white silke.
Delivered to the Roabes.
By Mr. Doctor Bayly, a pott of greene gynger, and a pott of the rynds of lemons.
By Mr. Doctor Gyfford, a pott of greene gynger, and a pot of the rynds of lemons.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Skidmore.
By Mr. Doctor Lopus, a peire of perfumed gloves, and a peire of white silke sypres.
Delivered the gloves to Mrs. Carre; the sipres to Mrs. Ratcliffe.
By Mr. Fynes, a longe cushion of purple satten, ymbrodered all over with damaske gold plate, Venis gold, and seed pearles of sundry sorts, with Justice in the middest, backed with yellow satten frenged, buttoned, and tasselld with Venis gold and purple silke.
Delivered to the said Robert Cotton.
By Mr. Spillman, a small peire of wrytinge tables of glass, garnished with silver gilte.
Delivered to Mrs. Ratclyff.
By Mr. William Huggens, a large sweete bagg of white satten, ymbrodered all over with Venis gold, silver, and silke of sundry cullors.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Skidmore.
By Mr. Carr, four stomachers of velvett, trymmed with a passamayn of Venis gold on the toppes; and two bells of jett, the clappers aggetts.
Delivered the stomacher to Mrs. Skidmore; the bells to Mrs. Ratcliff.
By Mr. Mountighu, one smock of fyne Holland cloth, faire wroughte with black silke.
Delivered to the said Mrs. Skidmore.
By Mr. Capteine Crosse, a faire large looking glasse set in frame, corded with crimson velvett, bound with a passamayn lace of Venis gold.
The glass broken.
By Mr. Huishe, one whole peece of lawne.
By Mrs. Dunston Amys, a beserte stone.
Dlievered to the said Mrs. Ratclyff.
By John Smithson, Master Cooke, one faire marchpayne, with St. George in the middest.
By John Dudley, Sargeante of the Pastry, one faire pye of quinces orringed.
Somma totalis of the money given to her Majestie amounteth to £.795 19s. 2d.


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