Wednesday, September 16, 2015

Sharing the Harvest - 1500s Marketing & Cooking & a little less Religion in Renaissance Italy

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Vincenzo Campi (Italian painter, c 1536 – 1591) The Fishmonger & Christ in the House of Mary and Martha


Vincenzo Campi (Italian painter, c 1536–1591) continued the Flemish theme of markets & people dining, but only rarely did he insert the religious scene in the background of his paintings. In fact, some of the paintings of Campi, such as his depictions of people eating, have been seen as lustful. While lust was certainly depicted between men & women in the Flemish paintings, it was seldom inserted into people's interactions with food itself.



Vincenzo Campi (Italian painter, c 1536 – 1591) The Fruit Seller



Vincenzo Campi (Italian painter, c 1536 – 1591) Kitchen



Vincenzo Campi (Italian painter, c 1536 – 1591) Chicken Vendors



Vincenzo Campi (Italian painter, c 1536 – 1591) Market Scene



Vincenzo Campi (Italian painter, c 1536 – 1591) Fishmongers



Vincenzo Campi (Italian painter, c 1536 – 1591) Fishmonger



Vincenzo Campi (Italian painter, c 1536 – 1591) The Cheese Eaters, circa 1580. Note: this is a tad lusty...

Annibale Carracci (Italian, Bolognese, 1560-1609) may have been the most admired painter of his time & a vital force in the creation of Baroque style. Carracci rejected the artificiality of Mannerist painting, championing a return to nature & everyday people engaged in daily activities. While he did produce religious paintings, he did not insert religious vignettes into his paintings of everyday folks fishing & hunting for, preparing, or eating food as the Flemish painters had several decades earlier.



Annibale Carracci (Italian, Bolognese, 1560-1609) Fishing



Annibale Carracci (Italian, Bolognese, 1560-1609) Hunting



Bartolomeo Passarotti (Italian artist, 1529-1592) Butcher Shop, 1580s. Note: perhaps a little lust here...

Butchers, fishmongers, & poultry peddlers appeared in the northern Italian art of  Bartolomeo Passarotti (1529-1592)  & Annibale Carracci, many made in Cremona & Bologna between about 1580 & 1585. The evolution of these Flemish-based scenes from daily life signaled the birth of more realist genre painting in Italy.



Bartolomeo Passarotti (Italian artist, 1529-1592) Les marchandes de volaille, 1577. Note: looks as if the market maid is wearing a tennis shoe...



Annibale Carracci (Italian, Bolognese, 1560-1609) Butcher Shop c 1580



Bartolomeo Passarotti (Italian artist, 1529-1592) The Fish Stall



Annibale Carracci (Italian, Bolognese, 1560-1609) The Butcher Shop



Bartolomeo Passarotti (Italian artist, 1529-1592) Two Market Women with Boy selling poultry, gourds, & onions



Bartolomeo Passarotti (Italian artist, 1529-1592) Baker Preparing Pies


These paintings are clearly related by format & subject to the earlier Flemish market scenes by Antwerp painters Pieter Aertsen & Joachim Beuckelaer. Italian artists changed the Flemish models by removing biblical motifs from the backgrounds of the contemporary markets & eating scenes.



Annibale Carracci (Italian, Bolognese, 1560-1609) The Bean Eater



Annibale Carracci (Italian, Bolognese, 1560-1609) Boy Drinking, 1582



Annibale Carracci (Italian, Bolognese, 1560-1609) The Bean Eater


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