Monday, April 4, 2016

18C Personifications of Spring - Fashion-Forward Maidens


1766 Spring Published by Carington Bowles After Robert Pyle done by James Watson London

Here Spring is a stylish young woman standing on garden terrace, adding a rose to flowers in her apron. Her elbow rests on the garden plinth of an urn covered in a trailing plant. A basket of flowers sits on the plinth.


18C Personifications of Spring - Fashion-Forward Maidens


1752 Spring published by Elizabeth Bakewell After Philippe Mercier London

Here Spring is a well-dressed young woman with bows down her bodice and a tipped hat, sitting on a grass garden ledge. She is holding a fan in her right hand and a flower in her left.




18C Personifications of Spring - Fashion-Forward Maidens


1750 Spring Published by Robert Sayer London

Here Spring is once again depicted as a fashionably-dressed young woman with flowers in her hair, picking a rose from a bush on the right, holding others in her apron, She is resting her elbow on a parapet overlooking a garden. In the background, a man is leaning against a garden balustrade and a couple stand in front of a domed garden temple.



18C Personifications of Spring - Fashion-Forward Maidens


1748 Spring Charles Corbutt After Robert Pyle Published by Robert Sayer London

Here Spring is depicted as a fashionably-dressed young woman standing on a garden terrace arranging a trailing plant around the plinth of an urn with a basket of flowers on the plinth. Here also is the bird visiting its nest in a tree behind to left. 


18C Personifications of Spring - Fashion-Forward Maidens


1711 Four Seasons Le Printems by Nicolas Chateau Published by Nicolas Chateau After Robert Tournières  Paris

Here Spring is depicted as a draped female figure, Her left breast is unveiled & exposed, and she is picking a flower from a curved garden arch above her.


5C-6C Female Personification of Spring


Bust of Spring ca. 5C– 6C CE Tapestry weave of dyed wools. The Metropolitan Museum of Art

This small tapestry panel comes from Egypt. That area had a major weaving (especially linen) industry throughout the ancient and medieval period, which brought the country a great deal of its trade and wealth. Unlike the textiles of other cultures, many of these pieces have been preserved by Egypt's hot, dry climate, which prevents rotting. Personifications of the seasons were thought to represent prosperity. 

Historically in many cultures, a female personification or a Spring goddess celebrated the hope of new growth as the decay of winter gave way to Nature's renewal and rebirth.  Spring begins with the first green shoots and explodes into a multitude of beautiful blossoms and promise of good harvest. In ancient times, communities often held festivals to celebrate Spring goddesses who were associated with flowering, growth and fertility of the land.