Friday, July 15, 2016

Women seeking Summer Shade - Rupert Charles Wulsten Bunny 1864–1947


Rupert Charles Wulsten Bunny (Australian artist, 1864–1947) The Distant Song


In 1895, Bunny met his future wife Jeanne Morel a fellow art student. She became the subject of many paintings, which from around this time increasingly depicted groupings of languid, dreamy female figures. These paintings reflect the leisured spirit of the belle époque, elegantly capturing voluptuous women, often holding fans; lounging inside homes; on porches & balconies; & in a bathhouse, often inhaling the intoxicating scent of freshly plucked summer flowers. Bunny modeled most of the figures on his wife Jeanne Morel, who sat for numerous paintings from this period.  Bunny’s depictions of his wife Jeanne & her friends typified the elegance, fashionable frills, & glamour of the seemingly endless summer that was the belle époque. 

Rupert Charles Wulsten Bunny (Australian artist, 1864–1947) Steps



Rupert Charles Wulsten Bunny (Australian artist, 1864–1947) Summer Morning 1908



Rupert Charles Wulsten Bunny (Australian artist, 1864–1947) Who Comes 1908



  Rupert Charles Wulsten Bunny (Australian artist, 1864–1947) Cherries, c 1908


 Rupert Charles Wulsten Bunny (Australian artist, 1864–1947) Detail Summertime, c 1907


 Rupert Charles Wulsten Bunny (Australian artist, 1864–1947) Idle Hours On the Balcony


Rupert Charles Wulsten Bunny (Australian artist, 1864–1947) Moonlight Sonata, 1907


Rupert Charles Wulsten Bunny (Australian artist, 1864–1947) Nattering



Rupert Charles Wulsten Bunny (Australian artist, 1864–1947) A Word of Advice


Morning Madonna


Attributed to Giotto (Ambrogio Bondone) (Giotto (Ambrogio Bondone) Unknown Master, Flemish (last quarter of the 15C) Nativity

In this blog, I try to begin each day with a painting of the Madonna & Child. It centers me; connects me to the past; & encourages me to post some of the religious paintings which were a large part of the core of early Western art.  In the 4C, as the Christian population was rapidly growing & was now supported by the state, Christian art evolved & became grander to suit new, enlarged public spaces & the changing contemporary tastes of elite private clients.