Saturday, September 10, 2016

Dog Days of Summer - Rupert Charles Wulsten Bunny 1864–1947 paints his wife & his dog


Rupert Charles Wulsten Bunny (Australian artist, 1864–1947) Jeanne with her Terrier



Rupert Charles Wulsten Bunny (Australian artist, 1864–1947) Tea Time - His wife Jeanne with her terrier

Rupert Charles Wulsten Bunny (Australian artist, 1864–1947) The Artist's Wife Jeanne and her terrier


Rupert Charles Wulsten Bunny (Australian artist, 1864–1947) Artist's Wife 1902



Rupert Charles Wulsten Bunny (Australian artist, 1864–1947) Jeanne 1910



Rupert Charles Wulsten Bunny (Australian artist, 1864–1947) A Cup of Tea 1911



Rupert Charles Wulsten Bunny (Australian artist, 1864–1947) Returning From the Garden 1906


Rupert Charles Wulsten Bunny (Australian artist, 1864–1947) The Artist's Wife Jeanne Morel



Rupert Charles Wulsten Bunny (Australian artist, 1864–1947) The Artist's Wife in the Garden



Rupert Charles Wulsten Bunny (Australian artist, 1864–1947) Mrs Bunny on a Green Sofa 1902

Dog Days of Summer is the name for the most sultry period of summer, from about July 3 to Aug. 11. Named in early times by observers in countries bordering the Mediterranean, the period was determined to extend from 20 days before to 20 days after the conjunction of Sirius (the dog star) & the sun.  The Greek poets Hesiod (ca. 750-650 BCE) & Aratus (ca. 310–240 BCE) refer, in their writings, to "the heat of late summer that the Greeks believed was actually brought on by the appearance of Sirius," a star in the constellation, that the later Romans, & we today refer to as Canis Major, literally the "greater dog" constellation. Homer, in the Iliad, references the association of "Orion's dog" (Sirius) with oncoming heat, fevers, & evil, in describing the approach of Achilles toward Troy:
Sirius rises late in the dark, liquid sky
On summer nights, star of stars,
Orion's Dog they call it, brightest
Of all, but an evil portent, bringing heat
And fevers to suffering humanity.

The term "dog days" was used by the Greeks in Aristotle's Physics.  Astronomer Geminus, around 70 B.C., wrote: "It is generally believed that Sirius produces the heat of the 'dog days,' but this is an error, for the star merely marks a season of the year when the sun"s heat is the greatest." The lectionary of 1559 edition of the Episcopal Book of Common Prayer indicates: "Naonae. Dog days begin" with the readings for July 7 & end August 18. But the readings for September 5 indicate: "Naonae. Dog days end."  This corresponds very closely to the lectionary of the 1611 edition of the King James Bible which indicates the Dog Days beginning on July 6 & ending on September 5.



Waterside with American artist Edward Henry Potthast 1857-1927


Edward Henry Potthast (American artist, 1857-1927)  Beach Scene



Edward Henry Potthast (American artist, 1857-1927)  Detail At the Beach

A painter of appealing impressionist works, Edward Henry Potthast (1857-1927) is best known for his vibrantly colored scenes of people at the beach. Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, which is far from the ocean, Potthast received his early art training at that city's McMicken School of Design. Drawn to the ocean, he sailed for Europe in 1881, to study in Antwerp & at Munich's Royal Academy.  Potthast returned to Ohio only briefly, working as a commercial lithographer while continuing his studies. By 1887, Potthast had once again set off for Europe, where he enrolled at the AcademiĆ© Julian in Paris, exhibiting in the Salons of 1889, 1890, & 1891.  Finally settling in New York City, Potthast regularly traveled to Coney Island, Brighton Beach, & Far Rockaway with his easel & paints. On summer visits to Massachusetts & Maine, he depicted the sea's more dramatic side, producing compelling views of New England's rugged, rock-strewn coastline.


 Edward Henry Potthast (American artist, 1857-1927) At the Beach 1910


 Edward Henry Potthast (American artist, 1857-1927)  A Holiday 1915


 Edward Henry Potthast (American artist, 1857-1927)  At the Seashore


 Edward Henry Potthast (American artist, 1857-1927)  Happy Days


 Edward Henry Potthast (American artist, 1857-1927)  In the Surf


 Edward Henry Potthast (American artist, 1857-1927)  Ring around the Rosy


 Edward Henry Potthast (American artist, 1857-1927)  Too Timid


 Edward Henry Potthast (American artist, 1857-1927) Bathers 1913


 Edward Henry Potthast (American artist, 1857-1927) Coney Island


Edward Henry Potthast (American artist, 1857-1927) Ladies in White Dresses


 Edward Henry Potthast (American artist, 1857-1927) The Fairies


Edward Henry Potthast (American artist, 1857-1927) The-Shade



Edward Henry Potthast (American artist, 1857-1927)  Detail A Day at the Beach



Edward Henry Potthast (American artist, 1857-1927)  Beach Umbrella



Edward Henry Potthast (American artist, 1857-1927)



Edward Henry Potthast (American artist, 1857-1927)  Detail - At the Seaside



Edward Henry Potthast (American artist, 1857-1927)  Detail - A Family Outing



Edward Henry Potthast (American artist, 1857-1927)  Long Beach 1922



Edward Henry Potthast (American artist, 1857-1927) Detail A Day at the Seashore


Morning Madonna


Antoniazzo Romano (c 1452-c 1512) Mother and Child

In this blog, I try to begin each day with a painting of the Madonna & Child. It centers me; connects me to the past; & encourages me to post some of the religious paintings which were a large part of the core of early Western art.  In the 4C, as the Christian population was rapidly growing & was now supported by the state, Christian art evolved & became grander to suit new, enlarged public spaces & the changing contemporary tastes of elite private clients.