Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Gone Fishing in the Caribbean - Winslow Homer 1836–1910



Winslow Homer (American artist, 1836-1910) Shark Fishing

During the 1880s, Winslow Homer vacationed in Florida, and the Caribbean, where he produced dazzling watercolors of people struggling with the sea & its creatures.  Strong men here challenge the ocean's overwheming power; but in the end, the timeless ocean would survive.  The strong, clever fishermen would die passing the task on to the next generation.


 Winslow Homer (American artist, 1836–1910) Hauling in anchor Key West



Winslow Homer (American artist, 1836-1910) The Gulf Stream



Winslow Homer (American artist, 1836–1910) Rum Cay



Winslow Homer (American artist, 1836–1910) The Conch Divers



Winslow Homer (American artist, 1836–1910)  West India Divers



Winslow Homer (American artist, 1836–1910) Done in the Bahamas (Fragment)



Winslow Homer (American artist, 1836–1910) The Water Fan



Winslow Homer (American artist, 1836–1910) Sponge Fishing (1885)



Winslow Homer (American artist, 1836–1910)  After the Hurricane, Bahamas



Winslow Homer (American artist, 1836–1910)  Fishing Boats, Key West



Winslow Homer (American artist, 1836–1910) Sponge Fishermen, Bahamas 1885



 Winslow Homer (American artist, 1836–1910) The Sponge Diver 1898–99



 Winslow Homer (American artist, 1836–1910) Market Scene Nassau 1885



Winslow Homer (American artist, 1836–1910)  Key West, Hauling Anchor 1903


Madonnas attributed to Giovanni Battista Cima da Conegliano c 1459–c 1517


Giovanni Battista Cima da Conegliano (c 1459–c 1517) Madonna and Child


Giovanni Battista Cima da Conegliano (c 1459–c 1517) Virgin and Child


Giovanni Battista Cima da Conegliano (c 1459–c 1517) Virgin and Child 1496

In this blog, I try to begin each day with a painting of the Madonna & Child. It centers me; connects me to the past; & encourages me to post some of the religious paintings which were a large part of the core of early Western art.  In the 4C, as the Christian population was rapidly growing & was now supported by the state, Christian art evolved & became grander to suit new, enlarged public spaces & the changing contemporary tastes of elite private clients.