Wednesday, October 22, 2014

A little gossip - Queen Margaret ‎(House of Habsburg) of Austria 1584–1611 a short life



Margaret of Austria, Queen of Spain (1584–1611)

Margaret of Austria (1584–1611), of the Habsburg family, became Queen consort of Spain & Portugal by her marriage to King Philip III, of the Habsburg family. Margaret was the daughter of Archduke Charles II of Austria, the son of Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand I & Maria Anna of Bavaria.


Margaret of Austria, Queen of Spain (1584–1611) by Juan Pantoja de la Cruz (Spanish painter, 1553-1608)

When she was 14, Margaret married Philip III of Spain (1576-1621), her 1st cousin, once-removed, in 1599, & became a very influential figure at her husband's court.


Margaret of Austria, Queen of Spain (1584–1611) by Juan Pantoja de la Cruz (Spanish painter, 1553-1608)

Although it was one of those strategically arranged marriages between the Austrian & Spanish Habsburgs, Philip had an "affectionate, close relationship" with Margaret, & paid her even more attention, after she bore him a son in 1605.


1603-09 Margaret of Austria by Bartolomé González y Serrano (1564–1627) 1603-1609

At the Spanish court, the Austrian Margaret was a patroness of the arts, a pious Catholic, "astute & very skillful" in her political dealings.


1607 Margaret of Austria, Queen of Spain (1584–1611) by Juan Pantoja de la Cruz (Spanish painter, 1553-1608)

However, life was not without its conflicts.  The pro-Austrian camp at the Spanish court was opposed by the Duke of Lerma, the King's chief minister, who argued that Spain should pursue her own course of action independently of religious (Catholic) or dynastic (Habsburg Family) ties.


1609 Bartolomé González y Serrano (1564–1627) Portrait of Margaret of Austria, Queen of Spain (1584–1611)

Queen Margaret was "melancholic" & unhappy about the influence of Duke, whom she considered corrupt & continually fought him for influence over the king.


Margaret of Austria, Queen of Spain (1584–1611) by Diego Rodríguez de Silva y Velázquez

The Duke of Lerma was eventually removed from power in 1618, but Margaret was already dead.


Juan Pantoja de la Cruz (Spanish painter, 1553-1608) Margaret of Austria, Queen of Spain (1584–1611) with her daughter Infanta Maria Anna who lived from Feb 1-Feb 2, 1603

Margaret & Philip were the parents of 8 children, of whom 5 survived into adulthood. At age 26, Margaret died, while giving birth to her child, Alfonso. Her husband never remarried & died 10 years later.


Portrait of Andres Lopez King Philip III of Spain (1576-1621)


Bartolomé González y Serrano (1564–1627) Portrait of the children of Philip III of Spain (Ferdinand, Alfonso and Margaret of Austria, Queen of Spain (1584–1611) 1612


Detail Child of Margaret of Austria, Queen of Spain (1584–1611) by Bartolomé González y Serrano (1564–1627) Alfonso Mauricio who lived 1611-12.


Detail Child of Margaret of Austria, Queen of Spain (1584–1611) by Bartolomé González y Serrano (1564–1627). Margarethe who lived 1610-17


Santiago Morán el Viejo (1571-1626) Child of Margarethe of Austria, Queen of Spain (1584–1611)


Madonnas attributed to Italian Barbara Longhi 1552–1638


Barbara Longhi (Italian painter, 1552–1638) was born in Ravenna, Italy, the daughter of mannerist painter Luca Longhi. She learned from her father & worked in Ravenna all her life. Although considered a minor painter, Vasari mentioned her "purity of line and soft brilliance of colour."

Barbara Longhi (Italian painter, 1552–1638) Madonna and Child c 1600


Barbara Longhi (Italian painter, 1552–1638) Madonna e o Menino 1596


Barbara Longhi (Italian painter, 1552–1638) Madonna and Child c 1580


Barbara Longhi (Italian painter, 1552–1638) Madonna and Child


Barbara Longhi (Italian painter, 1552–1638) Holy Family


Barbara Longhi (Italian painter, 1552–1638) Madonna Enthroned


Barbara Longhi (Italian painter, 1552–1638) Assumed to be a Self-Portrait as St Catherine of Alexandria 1589


In this blog, I try to begin each day with a painting of the Madonna & Child. It centers me; connects me to the past; & encourages me to post some of the religious paintings which were the core of early Western art. 


Tuesday, October 21, 2014

A little gossip - Duchess Suzane de Bourbon 1491-1521 died without heirs


1500 Suzanne de Bourbon-Beaujeu

Suzanne de Bourbon (1491–1521) was Duchess of Bourbon and Auvergne from 1503 to her death. Her husband was Charles de Bourbon.

She was the daughter & only surviving offspring of Peter II, Duke of Bourbon, & Anne of France, daughter of King Louis XI of France. She became duchess regant in 1503, after the death of her father. Her mother, Anne, acted as her regent during her minority & negotiated for several different marriages to ensure that she had a spouse who would protect her position.

On 10 May 1505, at Château du Parc-les-Moulins, Suzanne married her cousin Charles de Bourbon, head of the Montpensier family, a cadet branch of the Bourbons. Her husband was made her co-ruler through marriage.  Suzanne of Bourbon had 3 children, Francis de Bourbon, Count of Clermont, (1517-18) who only lived 6 months. She also had stillborn twins. Suzanne died at Château de Châtellerault. Her husband kept his position as Duke of Bourbon after her death. Her death without heirs caused her lands to eventually become a part of the kingdom of France.


Madonnas attributed to Italian Giorgio Vasari 1511–1574



Giorgio Vasari (Italian artist, 1511–1574) Holy Family with John the Baptist



Giorgio Vasari (Italian artist, 1511–1574) Adoration of the Shepherds



Giorgio Vasari (Italian artist, 1511–1574) Holy Family with St Francis



Giorgio Vasari (Italian artist, 1511–1574) The Nativity



Giorgio Vasari (Italian artist, 1511–1574) The Holy Family



Giorgio Vasari (Italian artist, 1511–1574) Adoration of the Magi


In this blog, I try to begin each day with a painting of the Madonna & Child. It centers me; connects me to the past; & encourages me to post some of the religious paintings which were the core of early Western art.


Monday, October 20, 2014

A little gossip - - Queen Juana I of Spain 1479-1555 a little unstable?



1500 Juan de Flandes (1460-1519) Joan the Mad

Joanna (1479–1555), nicknamed Juana la Loca, was the 1st queen regnant to reign over both the Crown of Castile (1504–55) & the Crown of Aragon (1516–55), a union which evolved into modern Spain. Besides the kingdoms of Spain, she also ruled the kingdoms of Sardinia, Sicily, & Naples in Italy; a vast colonial empire in the Americas; & was Countess of Burgundy & the consort of the Burgundian Netherlands.

Joanna with her parents, Isabella and Ferdinand in Rimado de la conquista de Granada by Pedro Marcuello, c. 1482.

She was the last monarch of the House of Trastámara & her marriage to Philip the Handsome initiated the rule of the Habsburgs in Spain. She succeeded her mother, Isabel I in 1505, & father Fernando in 1516.  Her father had nominated her as heir of all his possessions with her son as regent, because of her assumed mental instability, which is why she was known as Juana la Loca. 

Joanna around the time of her marriage, c. 1496

Some recent scholarship has attempted to separate Joanna's image from the appellation of "the Mad," seeking to demonstrate that she was the victim of the political ambitions of both her father and husband. She was known to be intelligent & educated. It was only after her marriage that accusations of mental instability began, perhaps because of her sympathy with Martin Luther's ideas. 

Joanna and her husband with their Spanish subjects

Despite her exclusion from power, Joanna remained the queen of Castile, reigning jointly after 1516 with her son Charles I, who became Charles V of the Holy Roman Empire.  Her husband Felipe I was king & regent 1504-06, & her son, Charles (or Carlos) I (& V of the Holy Roman Empire) became king in 1516.

This portrait of Joanna was done in Flanders, ca 1500 Detail from a wing of the Last Judgement Triptych of Zierikzee, by the Master of Afflighem


Madonnas attributed to Lorenzo Lotto 1480-1556


1521 Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1556) Virgin and Child with Sts Jerome and Nicholas of Tolentino 1521


Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1556) Adoration of the Shepherds


Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1556) Holy Family with Angels


Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1556) Madonna and Child with Saints


Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1556) Madonna and Child with Saints and Angel


Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1556) Madonna and Child with Saints


Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1556) Madonna and Child with St Catherine, Francis, Jerome, and John


Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1556) Madonna and Child with St Dominic, St Lorenzo, and St Urban


Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1556) Madonna and Child with St Ignatius of Antioch and St Onophrius


Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1556) Madonna and Child with St Peter Martyr


Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1556) Madonna and Child with Sts Peter, Christine, Liberale, and Jerome


Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1556) Madonna of the Rosary


Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1556) Madonna with the Child and Sts Rock and Sebastian


Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1556) Rest on the Flight to Egypt


Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1556) San Bartolomeo Altarpiece


Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1556) San Bartolomeo Altarpiece


Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1556) Santo Spirito Alterpiece


Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1556) The Holy Family with St Catherine of Alexandria


Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1556) The Nativity


Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1556) Virgin and Child with Saints


Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1556) Virgin and Child with Sts John the Baptist and Catherine


In this blog, I try to begin each day with a painting of the Madonna & Child. It centers me; connects me to the past; & encourages me to post some of the religious paintings which were the core of early Western art.